Community Risk Assessment Dashboard

Curious about what hazards may impact your neighborhood, either select a neighborhood from the dropdown or enter an address for your neighborhood to learn more about these hazards and what you can do to reduce the impacts of these hazards.

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The following hazards may impact your neighborhood, please click on the icons to learn more the risk to each of the hazards. Scroll to the bottom of the page to see potential mitigation projects to lessen the impacts.

Coastal Storms

Flooding

High Winds

Respiratory Virus

Earthquakes

Extreme Heat

Coastal Erosion

Mitigation Actions for Heat:

 

Maintain or plant a community garden.

By replacing asphalt lots with gardens reduces the absorption of the sun’s heat by dark surfaces. If you are interested in starting a community garden, NYC Departments of Parks and Recreation’s GreenThumb program supports communities as they navigate the process of starting a garden in their neighborhood.

 

 

Install a cool roof

Install a light-colored (green or white) roof to lower the building’s internal temperature and help reduce the urban heat island effect. You can learn more about building codes and the NYC CoolRoofs program on the NYC Small Business Services website.

 

 

 

Install high performance windows

These windows often have the following features:

  • Multiple glazing layers (panes of glass that are spaced apart), which increase and improve the window’s insulation and sound-reduction properties.
  • Low emissivity coatings – transparent layers of tin or silver oxide deposited on the glass surface which allow light to pass through while blocking a substantial amount of heat.

Mitigation Actions for Coastal Storms:

 

Create a rain garden

Rain gardens are composed of deeply rooted plants which collect and direct rainfall away from sewer systems. Rain gardens provide many benefits to the city by diverting water from the sewer system, reducing the urban heat
island effect, and improving air quality. You can learn more about rain gardens on the NYC DEP website.

 

 

Rain Garden Stewardship

If you would like to help care for rain gardens in your neighborhood, visit Become a Rain Garden Steward.

 

 

 

Clean Catch Basins

Ask residents in your building or who are part of your community organization to help keep storm drains clear of debris or call in problems to 311.

 

 

 

Install backflow valves

Using backflow valves, check valves, and drain plugs prevents sewer water from rising up into a residence through its basement plumbing.

 

 

 

 

 

Elevate high-priority contents

Elevating a residential building’s contents and critical systems is the most common technique to avoid flood damage. Elevating high-priority contents protects items from potential flood damage. Raising electrical, mechanical, and plumbing system equipment
above anticipated flood levels to appropriate design standards also helps to flood-proof property. Hiring a New York State-licensed Registered Architect or Professional Engineer provides building owners with the best options
for altering and retrofitting a home either to reduce or eliminate the risk that it might be damaged by storms or floods.

Ensure roof water properly drains away from building

To ensure roof water properly drains away from the building, owners should take several precautions — install proper downspout and roof draining, clean gutters regularly, and connect downspouts to appropriate drains.

Install rain barrels to capture water

Home owners can take an additional step to facilitate roof water-drainage by installing a rain barrel to capture storm water and drain it after the storm. For more information, see the website for the New York City Department
of Environmental Protection’s Rain Barrel Giveaway Program.

 

 

Install a green roof

A green roof is the elevated form of a rain garden. It provides the same benefits as a rain garden –diverting water from the City’s sewer system, reducing the urban heat island effect, and improving air quality. More information
on how to create a green roof is available on the NYC Buildings website.

Mitigation Actions for Flooding:

 

Create a rain garden

Rain gardens are composed of deeply rooted plants which collect and direct rainfall away from sewer systems. Rain gardens provide many benefits to the city by diverting water from the sewer system, reducing the urban heat
island effect, and improving air quality. You can learn more about rain gardens on the NYC DEP website.

 

 

Rain Garden Stewardship

If you would like to help care for rain gardens in your neighborhood, visit Become a Rain Garden Steward.

 

 

 

Clean Catch Basins

Ask residents in your building or who are part of your community organization to help keep storm drains clear of debris or call in problems to 311.

 

 

 

Install backflow valves

Using backflow valves, check valves, and drain plugs prevents sewer water from rising up into a residence through its basement plumbing.

 

 

 

 

 

Elevate high-priority contents

Elevating a residential building’s contents and critical systems is the most common technique to avoid flood damage. Elevating high-priority contents protects items from potential flood damage. Raising electrical, mechanical, and plumbing system equipment
above anticipated flood levels to appropriate design standards also helps to flood-proof property. Hiring a New York State-licensed Registered Architect or Professional Engineer provides building owners with the best options
for altering and retrofitting a home either to reduce or eliminate the risk that it might be damaged by storms or floods.

Ensure roof water properly drains away from building

To ensure roof water properly drains away from the building, owners should take several precautions — install proper downspout and roof draining, clean gutters regularly, and connect downspouts to appropriate drains.

Install rain barrels to capture water

Home owners can take an additional step to facilitate roof water-drainage by installing a rain barrel to capture storm water and drain it after the storm. For more information, see the website for the New York City Department
of Environmental Protection’s Rain Barrel Giveaway Program.

 

 

Install a green roof

A green roof is the elevated form of a rain garden. It provides the same benefits as a rain garden –diverting water from the City’s sewer system, reducing the urban heat island effect, and improving air quality. More information
on how to create a green roof is available on the NYC Buildings website.

Mitigation Actions for Earthquakes:

 

Increase interior safety

Any community organization space can be modified to protect people during an earthquake by securing bookcases and other top-heavy objects to walls and storing large, heavy items on lower shelves. Large pictures should not be hung above sofas or other
places where people sit.

Create community awareness of how to stay safe

Earthquake safety tips should be distributed so that community members understand the steps they can take to prepare themselves inside their homes. More advice on this topic is available on the ReadyNY website.

Anchor appliances and large items securely to walls

Owners should take the following precautions to safeguard residents from harm during earthquakes:

  • Strap water and gas heaters to a nearby wall to eliminate the risk that a falling gas water heater breaks the gas line and starts a fire.
  • Anchor large appliances to walls with safety cables or straps.
  • Bolt or strap cupboards, bookcases, and shelves to the wall and place heavy objects on the lower shelves.
  • Lock the rollers of any large appliance or piece of furniture.
  • Brace commercial fire protection systems so that sprinkler system lines do not tear away from their connection points.
  • Apply safety film to windows and glass doors.
  • Secure ceiling lights, suspended ceilings, and other hanging items, such as chandeliers and plants, to the permanent structure of the home.
  • Install latches on drawers and cabinet doors.
  • Securely mount flat-screen televisions, pictures, and mirrors.

 

 

Take precautions to reinforce and secure older masonry and wood buildings

Owners of older wooden and masonry buildings, which can be less stable than more recently constructed buildings, need to take additional precautions to mitigate risk of damage during earthquakes. For older brick or wooden
buildings that lack reinforcement, a New York State-licensed Registered Architect or professional engineer should be hired to assist building owners to:

  • Anchor all wood buildings to their foundations
  • Replace unreinforced masonry parapets with reinforced masonry parapets and anchor them to the rest of the building.
  • Replace all leaning parapets and unstable masonry chimneys.
  • Add bracing to anchor building parapets using diagonal steel struts and repair the parapet mortar.
  • Repair all masonry structural cracks by replacing the cracked bricks.
  • Anchor the roof frame to bearing walls.
  • Install bolts to connect the home to its foundation.

 

Hold drills and identify safe locations

Building owners can organize earthquake preparedness drills and help residents to identify safe places to be during an earthquake, such as under a solid piece of furniture and away from windows, hanging objects, or tall
furniture that could fall and hurt them.

Mitigation Actions for Erosion:

Create environmental stewardship programs with local residents

Shore Corps is a hands-on high-school student program in which participants work on environmental conservation, community planning and design, and civic engagement projects to create a more sustainable and equitable community
in the Rockaways.

Currently, Shore Corps is building climate resilience in the Rockaways by restoring dunes systems and working through the Rockaway Farm Share to make healthy, affordable fresh produce and knowledge about nutrition
choices more readily available in the community. For more information, visit riserockaway.org/rise.

Mitigation Actions for High Wind:

 

Know the safest place to seek safety

Building owners should inform residents and workers about the safest place they should go to if a severe thunderstorm or tornado warning is issued — typically a basement or a windowless interior room, such as a bathroom, closet, or inner hallway on the
lowest level of the building.

Replace weaker window glass

Homeowners and other building owners should replace glass that is not rated for high New York City winds – that is, rated 30 pounds per square foot for buildings less than 100 feet high.

Replace small gravel covering the roof

Roof ballast is designed to use its weight to anchor the roof to the structure. Pea gravel or small stones are commonly used to anchor roofs; however, during a tornado or high winds, these materials can quickly become high-speed projectiles. Building
owners need to replace small roof gravel with roofing ballast that conforms to sizes indicated in the NYC Building Code.

Mitigation Actions for Respiratory Viruses with Pandemic Potential:

Preventing a pandemic respiratory virus from establishing itself within the City is impossible. Actions will prioritize limiting the impact and slowing the spread of disease. The City will work with the healthcare system, state and federal partners, including
the CDC, and private and non-profit sectors to manage the response and lessen its impact on New York City.

 

Social Distancing

In the early stages of an influenza pandemic, before a vaccine is available (usually 4 to 6 months but possibly longer), community measures are essential to limiting the spread of disease. As droplets can reach from 3 to
6 feet after they are expelled into the environment by a cough or sneeze, increasing the spacing between individuals can reduce exposure. In the event of an influenza pandemic, it is recommended that people:

 

  • Stay home. All New Yorkers — healthy or sick — need to stay home. Only leave your home for essential tasks, such as work (if you cannot work from home), getting groceries and supplies or essential medical care. Try
    to use delivery services when possible.
  • Wear a face covering when interacting with people outside your household and stay at least 6 feet away from others.
  • Avoid crowded spaces including restaurants and bars that are not following official guidance.
  • If you are an older adult or have any of the chronic health conditions listed above, avoid all unnecessary gatherings and events.
  • Private employers allow employees to work from home or stagger their work hours.
  • Walk or bike to work, if possible.
  • If the train or bus is too crowded, wait for the next one.

 

Promoting Workplace Controls

Respiratory viruses can easily spread in the workplace. Both employers and employees can exercise environmental controls to limit its spread. Employers can:

  • Maintain standard workplace cleaning routines.
  • Encourage employees to stay home if they are sick and to not return to work until they have been fever-free for 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medications.
  • Ensure access to hand-washing facilities or to alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Promote vaccination.
  • Promote respiratory etiquette, which includes mask wearing, keeping hands clean and away from your face, and discouraging hand shaking.

 

 

Personal Hygiene

 

  • Wash your hands with soap and water often, for at least 20 seconds every time, or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer
  • Wear a face covering.
  • Do not touch your face unless you recently washed your hands.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or sleeve when sneezing or coughing. Do not use your hands.
  • Do not shake hands. Instead, wave or elbow bump.
  • • Get your flu shot. While seasonal flu vaccines are not designed to protect against pandemic influenza, a flu shot will reduce your likelihood of getting seasonal flu at a time when the healthcare system is strained.